Monday, April 28, 2008

Week Three...

It's 6:00 in the morning and I've been up for one and a half hours already... another early start to the week with Catherine leaving at 5:30 to catch the early morning flight to Vancouver...

Start of week three with me and the kids!

Going to Try out a New Approach

After listening to the Fountains of Wayne last evening, I got this "Ah-HA" moment. I'd posted previously about my aversion to writing lyrics a couple weeks ago. I've been labouring over writing lyrics to music I've been playing around with in my head. Things haven't been flowing very well - writing about these "lofty" kinds of things.

The guys in FOW are phenomenal songwriters - catchy tunes, great hooks, lyrics... - songs that I enjoy to listen to. I started listening to the lyrics (since that's been one thing I have been trying to actively do these days) and found them to not necessarily be these heavy-handed things in terms of subject matter. I mean, there are songs about a relationship being likened to "Traffic and Weather" another one about a Subaru car... pretty quirky, funny things.

I then started to think, well, why do I have to try and do something heavy handed? I don't necessarily have any expertise in that, plus, I'm not enjoying writing about that, so why not something that's close to my life? Quirky, funny... something I actually know about? Duh...

Now, to cull down the subject matter... :)

Online Presence

I'm listening to an interview of Derek K. Miller - the co-host of the podcast I've been part of "Inside Home Recording". He's talking with Nora Young on CBC's "Spark" program. They're talking about Derek's digital legacy.

He has been undergoing treatment for cancer and is facing the possibility of his life being cut short by the disease. He's been a self-described "geek" for a long time and has been blogging since the start of the century.

What I found quite revealing in the interview was the concept of what he and Nora were terming as his "digital legacy" - what happens to all the stuff that he did online when he's not around anymore. People concentrate on a lot of different things in writing their wills - mostly on material and monetary items, but what happens in this day and age to their lives they've lead in the digital realm?

Unlike "reality", a lot of what you do online can be kept and maintained ... if you keep up with it. It makes for a very interesting "what if" scenario. What if your ancestors had access to the technology we had these days and you could go through their online records, peruse their blogs, look at their IM chats, find other records about them? I'd think it'd be quite interesting. I never knew two of my grandparents, I just have odd tidbits my parents told me of them - beyond that level of my family tree, there are a few photos and official records that my dad has collected in his genealogy research, but that's it.

I don't really know what they were like as people. What'd they think of? What was their life like?

Besides using this as a communication tool and jotting down my (seemingly) random thoughts, I'd like to think that sometime in the future, someone may find it interesting or helpful to read through and get a bit of an insight into who I was, what I was thinking, what made me "tick".

I truly doubt it'll be some best selling memoir or what have you, but I'm thinking one of my future relatives may look at the branch/limb on the family tree with my name and wonder - who was that? ... and then be able to find out with a quick search.

Things that make you go hmmm...

No comments: